Monthly Archives: August 2015

SOME Q&A JUST FOR ASSISTANT PROFESSORS IN SCIENCE!

 

Assistant Professors now Spend Most of their Workday Applying for Research Grants!   (http://dr-monsrs.net)

Assistant Professors now Spend Most of their Workdays Applying for Research Grant Awards!     (http://dr-monsrs.net)

 

Assistant Professors in science are younger university faculty who work on research, teaching, and assorted BS.  They often also are busy with marriage, buying a house, and starting a family.  After obtaining their first research grant award as an independent investigator, they begin supervising graduate students in their area of science expertise.  The twin career targets of Assistant Professors are to get their research grant(s) renewed, and to obtain tenure.

This article is only for Assistant Professors!  It uses a question and answer format to give my advice about handling certain tasks and problematic situations commonly faced by junior faculty in any area of science.  This advice is based upon my own personal experiences and observations as a science faculty member in several universities.  I hope these discussions will prove interesting and useful to you!

Why is my salary so low as an Assistant Professor? 

Assistant Professors are at the bottom of the academic ladder!  Some prestigious universities limit the salaries of their junior faculty to inappropriately low  levels.  Upon being promoted to tenured rank, the former Assistant Professors then get a major increase in salary.  The usual explanation is that universities want junior faculty to prove their institutional commitment, and they need to keep all their senior long-term employees happy.  I feel that this policy actually is just another part of universities always trying to maximize their financial profits; the same self-centered business mentality also explains why some of these same institutions only infrequently award tenure to their junior faculty!

Upon being hired, I was given only a very small lab.  I now have a good first grant with one postdoc and 3 new grad students, and so need more lab space.  How can I get this without upsetting other faculty here? 

The first part of your question is easy: get a second research grant award and you will receive assignment of more lab space.  If additional space is not offered, then you should realize that your institution probably is not very serious about scientific research.  Tell your departmental chair that you see no choice but to move, since your grant-supported research is being hindered; that might cause a revision of your research space assignment.  Otherwise, take appropriate action to find a better employer and give yourself a greater chance to be satisfied with your career as a scientist. 

The second part of your question is totally difficult, because lab space always is tight, and all science faculty are competing with each other for space assignments.  If any faculty member is given additional space for their research activities, then someone else’s assignment must be reduced; even if it is completely obvious that you fully  deserve more lab space, human nature says that the person losing space will always have a grudge against you.  Try to find some senior professor who has your respect, and ask for advice about this very sticky situation. 

Are research collaborations important for Assistant Professors? 

The short answer is, “yes indeed!”.  External collaborations will help your research  publications become more solid, and these coworkers usually will be your supporters for promotions and grant reviews.  Internal collaborations within your department and your university often are the start of developing a small research group, and are particularly valuable when you are being considered for promotion to tenure.  Collaborations are good both for science and for business! 

I just got re-appointed as an Assistant Professor.  What should I do in order to become tenured? 

The traditional answer to your question is that achieving excellence in research and in teaching will qualify you to become tenured.  Those activities will help, but they certainly do not explain either why some junior faculty are tenured despite their weak accomplishments, or why some accomplished candidates are denied a promotion to tenure.  My best answer to your question is to pass on the advice that one of my more senior colleagues at a different university gave me when I asked him the same question: “What you really have to do is to fit in with the rest of the faculty in your department.  Make them see that you are valuable to them.”  I believe he is 100% correct.  Both grants and effective teaching have importance, but your ability to be part of the group is what will really make your Chair and other faculty support your promotion to tenured rank. 

Is it necessary to become tenured? 

In principle, academic tenure is a promise that you will never be fired from your job without just cause, thereby guaranteeing your freedom of thought and speech.  Of course, the very best long-term job security is not tenure, but is to have such good professional success that other quality institutions would be delighted to hire you.  I know one unusual scientist who decided to forgo tenure because it was such a bother to go through the evaluation process; he was independently wealthy and requested to continue working at his university without being tenured.  His employer said no way!  Eventually there was a crisis situation with his packing up all his stuff in preparation for moving (i.e., several other institutions wanted to hire him!).  His employer finally gave him a very expedited review and promptly announced that he now was tenured.   Thus, the actual answer to your question is “yes”; however, do not forget that the soft-money faculty at universities are not tenured. 

I am fortunate to have acquired several research grant awards.  Instead of being considered for tenure, can I just switch into a soft-money position?  That move will get me a higher salary than my hard-money position! 

Making such a switch would be quite unusual and will be questioned for the rest of your career.  I can only suggest that you should make a written list of all the positive and negative features for making that change, and then debate with yourself what you should do.  It is worth noting that many scientists working on soft-money positions in both universities and industries are not tenured, but still  have a good and productive career.  Their employment actually has quite a lot of security without any tenure so long as they always perform well and fulfill the needs of their job situation. 

After 6 years working as an Assistant Professor, my application for promotion to tenure was unexpectedly turned down!  What the hell am I supposed to do now? 

Think clearly about how you will answer the following key questions: (1) If that decision would be reversed, would you now want to stay on as a faculty employee? (2) Previous to this negative decision, did any other institutions ever voice an interest in hiring you?  (3) If you could magically be hired in any position at any location you wish, what would you work on and where would the new employer be located?  Your answers will indicate: (1) if you want to stay at your present job site, (2) what are your best opportunities for a new job in academia, and, (3) how much you still want to do research work at some university, versus switching into a research position in industry or a science-related job outside of universities (see: “Other Jobs for Scientists, Part II” , and, “Part III” ).  

Having to move saves some scientists from lengthy dissatisfaction and endless emotional turmoil!  Do try to calm down and clear your mind so you can better decide what you really want to do with the rest of your life and career.  I wish you good luck! 

I was just turned down for tenure, but I far outperformed another Assistant Professor who received tenure!  Should I file a lawsuit about my unjust decision? 

Mistakes about tenure are made rather frequently, so welcome to the club!  My advice is to try to picture yourself some years into the future … if you win a lawsuit and then are given tenure, will you really be satisfied and at ease 10 years from now?  I doubt it, and suggest that you will still be upset.  Recognize that lawsuits in academia take nearly forever to be adjudicated (e.g., several to many years), and always are very expensive for the initiator (i.e., you might have to sue an entire state or city if your university is part of some government). 

Concluding remarks.

Assistant professors undergo many trials and tribulations in addition to working on their research and teaching activities.  It is not an exaggeration to say that they are always under observation,  evaluation, and pressuring by someone (e.g., their Chair, the Deans, administrators, graduate students, postdocs, classroom students, fellow teachers, fellow committee members, manuscript referees and editors, reviewers of grant applications, officials at granting agencies, safety office, etc., etc.).  Those who continue to be active and productive researchers while dealing with all this crap certainly deserve lots of credit! 

Tenure is not everything, does not always protect freedom of opinion and speech, and, is not much used by faculty for its main purpose.  It often is misused and abused,  both by universities and by faculty.  I personally know an Assistant Professor who became tenured, and from the very next day on he never again stepped into his lab; how utterly disgusting! 

 

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SOME Q&A JUST FOR POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH FELLOWS IN SCIENCE!

 

Look!  I'm Getting Paid to have Fun Doing Research!   (http://dr-monsrs.net)
Postdocs are Paid to have Lots of Fun Doing Research!!    (http://dr-monsrs.net)

 

By producing new research publications in science journals, postdoctoral fellows try to grow their reputation as active young scientists full of promise (see: “Postdocs, Part 2” ).  Postdoctoral researchers also typically solidify their identity with a given field of science.  One or more postdoctoral training periods usually are followed by acquisition of professional employment in universities, medical schools, industries, science-related organizations, new small businesses, etc.

This article is only for postdocs! It uses a question and answer format to offer my advice about some common problematic situations faced by postdocs in any area of science.  This advice is based upon my own experiences and observations during 2 postdoctoral appointments, and later as a faculty researcher and teacher.  I hope all of this will prove interesting and useful to you!

What practical accomplishments should I work for as a Postdoc? 

Number one is to make research discoveries of importance, so that you will be first author of publications in major science journals.  Number 2 is to expand your technical expertise with research instruments, experimental approaches, and, subjects being investigated (e.g., other minerals, other stars, other life forms, other bases for chemical synthesis, etc.).  Number 3 is to make yourself known to leaders in your chosen research field; this often will provide more opportunities later when you are seeking a job opening, a collaborator, or, advice and counsel.  All of these will help establish your identity and reputation as a professional scientist. 

How can I work on my own special subject of interest as a postdoc? 

This common question is misplaced, since you should have settled this before accepting any appointment as a postdoctoral fellow (see “Postdocs, Part 2” ).  Once your position starts, your options are limited because you then are obligated to work on the research project(s) of your chosen mentor.  Recognize that all the skills and experience you acquire now with any research operations can be used sometime later to examine your own favorite research subjects.  

Should I work only on a single research project as a postdoc? 

If your mentor approves, you can work on other projects, too, if they do not interfere with your primary research objective.  For example, you might contribute your expertise with some research instrument to the project of a fellow postdoc who does not know how to operate that, but needs the data.  These internal collaborations are a good way to get some extra publications and to increase your range of research experience.  But, remember what your chief effort always must be given to! 

How can I, as a young postdoctoral researcher, get noticed by other scientists? 

You must take the lead! The number one way to get noticed is to publish important results of your research in good science journals; quality always gets noticed, and speaks for itself.  You should present research results every year at science meetings.  At meetings, you can invite a few selected scientists to come and look at your poster; if they have given an invited talk, find them and ask one or 2 well-phrased questions about their research.  Another good request is to ask for permission to show one of their published figures during your presentation of an abstract at a science meeting. 

Should I take a second or third postdoctoral position? 

If you are committed to finding employment as a research scientist, but no suitable job openings are available, then the answer is “yes”.  With an additional postdoctoral period, you then will be able to continue doing research and will gain additional publications.  However, if you have not found a job because you are out-competed by other job seekers, you should look for additional training at another postdoctoral position so that will fill in your weak area(s).  There is nothing wrong with working as a postdoc for some longer time, provided you are not used as a technician or a slave.  If you can find a suitable mentor who values your work, has research interests like yours, and is well-funded, this can be eminently satisfactory; as a “Research Associate”, your salary will advance, you will publish as first author,  and you will not need to worry about getting research grants. 

How can I learn about good job openings? 

As the saying goes, “Read Science (magazine) backwards!”.  Study all their listed jobs every week, so that you can discern who is offering jobs, what types of positions are available, and which job opportunities and requirements are prominent with different fields and different kinds of employers; there also are several other good sites listing science job openings on the web.  Annual meetings of science societies often have a job center listing current openings; in some cases, interviews are conducted at these meetings.  Let a few of your professional contacts (e.g., scientists familiar with your work, your former thesis advisor, members of your thesis committee, external collaborators, etc.) know that you are actively looking for a position; not all jobs are advertised, and your associates might bring a few of those to your attention. 

What is most valuable in a postdoc’s curriculum vitae (c.v.) for landing a good job? 

Number one is peer-reviewed publications of your important research results.  Number 2 is how many research methods and instruments you have used and mastered.  Having given some guest lectures in a course could help in getting a university faculty job.  Attending advanced technical workshops can be a plus.  Applying for a patent, receiving a postdoctoral grant, or giving invited seminars always is impressive.  Customize your c.v. for each open position (i.e., an application for a university job is quite different from an application submitted for a job at an industrial R&D center). 

What should I present for my job seminar?  

Present something that is interesting, very solid science, and not too controversial.  Include some results that are not yet published, and be absolutely certain to leave at least 10 minutes for questions from the audience before your scheduled time limit is over.  Remember that your audience must be able to comprehend everything you say, and must see exactly how you and your research will fit into their local activities (i.e., not all employers want to hire a super hot dog researcher!).

How do I find out about the research grant system? 

First, ask your postdoctoral mentor and other local research grant holders to advise you about their strategy for meriting an award.  If your mentor reviews grant applications, request that you will be allowed to read one of them and then to also read their critique.  Second, carefully study the detailed instructions for writing a grant application put out by the several different federal granting agencies.  Third, if and when you feel up to it, spend one month to compose a practice grant application; ask your mentor to criticize it, and you then will learn very much that you now do not know! Lastly, study my recent article on “Unasked Questions about Research Grants for Science, and My Answers!” .  

Why will I later have to spend so very much time with research grant applications?  I want to work on research, not on shuffling papers! 

The short answer is that science faculty in academia need to obtain money for their research expenses, and research grants are the traditional way to get that.  What makes this much more difficult nowadays is the intense hyper-competition for getting research grant awards (see: “All About Today’s Hyper-competition for Research Grants” ); every scientist is competing with all other scientists, and everything in a career as a university scientist depends upon getting and staying funded.  Recognize clearly that as a university scientist you also will be a business person (see: “Money Now is Everything in Scientific Research at Universities “ , and, “What is the Very Biggest Problem for Science Today?” )! 

After my first postdoctoral job, I have decided that I will not work in a university.  I want a science-related job in business.  How should I apply for such? 

My best suggestion is for you to seek advice on good approaches from one or more scientists having exactly such a position.  Be rigorous in checking out all possible employers, and note who has been hired recently.  Before your interview, get facts and figures about each business, and then adapt your c.v. or resume to the specific company or opening.  Try to construct a few ideas whereby your science and research training will help them with their business activities and objectives.  Be aware that many large companies have an initial training period when  the new employee is fully instructed about their business and the employee’s role(s). 

Concluding remarks. 

For many university scientists, their postdoctoral years were the best and most exciting in their entire career.  Work hard and enjoy it! 

 

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SOME Q&A JUST FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS IN SCIENCE!

 

Graduate Students in Science Must be Very Clever!   (http://dr-monsrs.net)
Graduate Students in Science Must Always be Very Clever!   (http://dr-monsrs.net)

 

Although each different graduate school has its own special flavor, they all provide specialized knowledge in a given field of science, and, organized 1:1 instruction about how to conduct research experiments and be a scientist.  Typically, graduate students learn a lot from courses and laboratory work, assemble and defend  a doctoral thesis, and, produce one or more research publications.  Graduate school usually is followed by intensive semi-independent research as a postdoctoral fellow.

This article is only for graduate students in science!  It uses a question and answer format to advise you about how to handle some common problematic situations in graduate school.  Further information and other opinions certainly should be sought from your fellow students, your official advisor, and any of your course instructors.   My advice is based upon my own experiences and observations as a graduate student and later as a faculty researcher and teacher.  I hope all of this will prove interesting and useful to you!

Why do I have to take yet more courses in graduate school?  I want to learn how to do research!    

Graduate school training provides a number of useful features needed by all research scientists: (1) classroom courses instill in-depth knowledge and advanced understanding about one or several areas of science; (2) laboratory courses provide detailed knowledge about research approaches and methods; (3) coursework with library and internet studies, and making oral presentations, give experience in explaining your research  and answering questions.  These are directly related to what you will do later, no matter where you will be employed.  Any advanced course including critical analysis of research investigations will increase your own skills with design of experiments, picking adequate controls, and drawing valid conclusions from a given set of experimental data.  You will learn the practice of doing good lab research when you begin work in the lab of your thesis advisor.  Being a scientist is more than just performing experiments!

I’m not good with math!  Why must I take a statistics course?  

I strongly recommend that all graduate students should take a course in applied statistics because it will help deal with experimental design and data analysis.  You don’t have to become an expert, but you almost certainly will need to know how to use the basic concepts and procedures.  

How should I pick my thesis advisor? 

Ideally, you have enrolled in a graduate school because you already picked one or several faculty scientists you want to train you.  If your choice is still open, then the following general criteria seem most important.  The best thesis advisor has: (1) a successful research career in the special field you are most interested in, (2) an active research grant (and preferably, this has been renewed), (3) a good record for training and placing graduate students (and postdocs), (4) ambition to excel in the special field of interest, and (5) room for you to work in their lab.  Discuss any questions or concerns with your selected professor before you begin.

What do research rotations accomplish?  It seems like a waste of time to me! 

Most of your research experience in grad school comes under the supervision of your thesis advisor.  Picking this person is an extremely important task that will follow you for the rest of your career.  Most schools require a rotation through the laboratories of at least 3 different professors; to be meaningful, each rotation should extend for 1-2 months.  Via these rotations, new grad students will learn what each supervisor is like, what research questions are being attacked in their lab, what instruments and methods are in use, what staff (technicians, postdocs, collaborators, and other students) are working in each lab, and, what each supervisor expects from their graduate student colleagues.  After these  rotations, the student should be able to decide who they want to study with; the faculty use this experience to evaluate students with regard to interest, level of energy, intelligence, aptitude to learn and acquire skills, and, mentality.  The rotations also provide initial entries into your list of methods and instruments you know how to use, so they are valuable even if you already know which professor you will select.

What do I do if there is no professor working on my main subject of interest?

First, admit that you have made a mistake!  You should have seen whether there were suitable mentors before you enrolled in any school.  Second, decide if you are willing to make some changes in your main interests so that you can work with faculty that are available.  Third, if not, then apply to transfer into another department or a different graduate school having one or more faculty scientists working in your area of interest.

What should my doctoral thesis accomplish? 

Successfully completing and defending a graduate school thesis is taken as proof that you are qualified to be a scientific investigator, a teacher of science, and an expert on some aspect of modern science. The findings from your experimental studies show what you can do in research, and are the first basis to establish your reputation as a professional scientist.  Any good thesis will provide you with one or more publications in professional science journals, and might also result in your obtaining a patent.  Successful defense of your thesis entitles you to be hired in a number of different employment situations.

My thesis advisor just had his grant renewal turned down, so I must hurry up to finish my project!  But, I only have worked on it for one year!  Help! 

You indeed have a difficult problem!  You must first discuss all possible options with your thesis advisor.  In some cases, there might be another professor working in a similar or related area who will let you continue your current research within their lab.  In other cases, you might have to move into some other area of interest, and then find a new thesis advisor.  Yet other possibilities include moving into a different department at the same graduate school, or transferring into another school.  Depending on all the logistics and the time limitations, it might be good to use what you already have done to first acquire a Master’s Degree with your present advisor.

I am half way to completing my doctoral thesis; how soon should I start looking for a postdoctoral position and for a job? 

I recommend starting both today!  You can never begin too early with these tasks!  At science meetings, observe what other scientists are working on, who is researching in your area(s) of interest, and who gives invited presentations.  Go up to some and ask a good question; if you have a poster, you can invite them to view it.  Take a look at the job openings displayed at science meetings, and, start deciding what kind of employment and which locations appeal to you.  Everything you do as a graduate student says what you are; this will be fully inspected when you later apply for a postdoctoral position or a job.

I have been a grad student for 6 years, and my thesis advisor wants me to do still  more work.  Maybe I will never be able to finish!  What can I do? 

This is a common problem!  Students always want to finish graduate school and start being a Postdoc as soon as possible, but thesis advisors want them to do a very complete and excellent job with their thesis research.  The goals of both parties are natural and good.  I know several grad students who finished only after 10 years of work!

I offer the following advice.  Above all else, try to maintain good relations with your thesis advisor, and recognize that this person knows more than you do about science and careers in science.  Discuss all with him or her, and try to get an explicit list of exactly what you still need to accomplish; then, get to work and monitor your own progress every month.  If that only produces more problems, then discuss your situation with one or more members of your thesis advisory committee.  I cannot say anything further because I do not know if you are wasting time, fully understand what is needed to get a doctoral degree, are getting good results from your experiments, etc.; your thesis committee should know all of this, so ask for advice from them.

Concluding remarks.   

Almost all graduate students encounter some perplexing situation(s) in graduate school.  Handling those challenges is part of your advanced education!  You do not have to take my advice, but you should carefully consider how and why your views disagree with my recommendations.  It often is valuable to discuss everything with a trusted faculty scientist or another graduate student (i.e., one attending a different school).  Good luck!

 

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A FINAL JUDGMENT IS GIVEN TO DR. HARUKO OBOKATA: MISCONDUCT OF RESEARCH!

 

Scientific research findings are not always valid!   (http://dr-monsrs.net)
Scientific research findings are not always valid!   (http://dr-monsrs.net)

 

Unfortunately, some doctoral scientists cheat.  With the terrible job pressures  in working on research at modern universities, the temptation to take the easy way out by being dishonest is always present (see: “Introduction to Cheating and Corruption in Science”).  Examples of dishonesty in science continue to pop up almost every month [e.g., 1-4], and many more escape notice.  Fortunately, most professional scientists have good ethical standards and do not cheat.  The few corrupted scientists who are caught usually are penalized in a rather soft manner, and publicity always is minimized so as to avoid undermining the enormous trust that the public has for professional scientists.

This article presents the sad story of Dr. Haruko Obokata, a young Japanese researcher who now has been very thoroughly investigated and penalized for research fraud [e.g., 3,4].  This case is particularly worthy of attention because it dramatically illustrates what can make a scientist cheat (see: “Why Would any Scientist ever Cheat?” ), and the consequences that can follow later.

Background to the controversy about Dr. Obokata’s research. 

Dr. Obokata worked as a researcher at the Riken Center for Developmental Biology, one of the most prestigious research institutes in Japan.  She investigated “stem cells“, which are pluripotent cells that can be induced to become different normal cell types.  Medical science is very interested in stem cells for possible use in repairing and replacing damaged organs.  Dr. Obokata reported finding a simple and easy new method to produce many stem cells with 2 papers in the stellar science journal, Nature.  This research finding was a big surprise; her new method was totally unexpected, gave wonderful results, and was labeled as being revolutionary.  Dr. Obokata  became very famous overnight; many news stories about her spectacular research results were issued, and interviews with her were featured on television.  Soon after her publications appeared, other scientists eagerly tried to duplicate her reported results, but they all were not successful; this rapidly led to many questions about her amazing research findings and the truthfulness of her research.  For science, research results must be reproducible to be considered valid.  

Due to the enlarging doubts raised about her research results, local investigations were undertaken, but these only produced more questions and more controversy.  Extensive investigations followed, and produced no verification of her new methodology.  Throughout this controversy, Dr. Obokata maintained that her research results were real, but she was not able to explain why other scientists could not duplicate her results.  Many coworkers, supervisors, and other researchers then were questioned as the large controversy expanded further.  Finally, Dr. Obokata was asked to duplicate her own published lab results at Riken while she was being observed by a panel of fellow scientists; after 8 months of work in the lab, the results of this definitive test were negative [3].  Just a few months ago, after almost 2 years of investigations by institutions and governmental bodies,  an expert panel in Japan finished their deliberations and issued a final verdict that Dr. Obokata was guilty of research misconduct [3,4].  

Consequences of the guilty verdict for Dr. Obokata. 

This verdict now is finalized, the papers in Nature were retracted, and, Dr. Obokata has resigned from her position at Riken and been fined [3,4].  The penalties in this judgment also include reprimands for several of her supervisors and associates; one supervisor was so upset at the shame of this very public situation that he committed suicide at age 52 [3].  A number of high officials at the reorganized Riken were replaced in the accompanying administrative scandal; due to this widely publicized situation, the national government was stimulated to issue revised standards for research conduct and misconduct [4]. 

Many feel that the cause of Dr. Obokata’s unethical activities with data manipulation and fabrication once again lies in the intense pressures on academic scientists to make important discoveries, publish spectacular reports, and obtain more research funding.  The exact same pressures today are acting upon very many other university scientists all over the world; undoubtedly, some others also will succumb to the temptation to use dishonest means to overcome these job pressures.  

Is this misconduct a general feature in science, or is it peculiar to certain cultures? 

As I have noted previously (see: “Why is it so Very Hard to Eliminate Fraud and Corruption in Scientists?” ), the ultimate cause of unethical conduct in scientific research is simply human nature.  Scientists are just like all other people in that they can and do make mistakes and wrong judgments.  Thus, I believe that this old problem of dishonesty in science is very general.  Human cultures certainly do influence their science.  In some countries, new doctoral theses complete with tables of data and full analyses are available for purchase.  In such  cases, more dishonesty must be expected later when the new doctoral scientist starts researching and publishing.  However, even large modern countries with very extensive good research operations still have ongoing problems with corruption and misconduct of research.  Thus, this general problem is not only due to culture or nationality. 

The case with Dr. Obokata is somewhat less severe than another recent finding of large shocking misconduct at the University of Tokyo [e.g., 4].  These scandals led to  important changes in policies, awareness, and education about  science ethics in Japan.  I must explicitly note here that this problem is not peculiar to Japan!  I have no reservations in making that statement, since I know many honest scientists in Japan, and always am most positively impressed with the high quality of Japanese science.  These recent ethical scandals in Japan’s research enterprise are just like those in other modern countries.  

What does this example of misconduct say about modern science?  

The events in Dr. Obokata’s case are typical for previous instances where cheating at research has been caught: (1) it takes a whole big bunch of time and effort to finally reach a verdict, simply because it is extremely difficult to ever prove dishonesty when the alleged perpetrator maintains insistence that the false results are really true; (2) the investigations always expand to include collaborators and coworkers, supervisors, reviewers and editors, and, the prevailing atmosphere for professional ethics at the institution(s) involved; (3) after a verdict finally is reached, all of science gets a bad name; and, (4) although reforms are made to prevent this from happening so easily, the actual causes for misconduct in modern science always remain unaffected

Nobody ever seems to focus attention and reforms on the gigantic pressures faced by all scientists doing research in modern universities (e.g., get more research grant money, get more research publications, get more experimental results and more discoveries, get more research breakthroughs, etc.).  These are not simply job duties or expectations, but rather are constant worries for university scientists.  Failure to succeed in these efforts will have bad consequences for the career of any faculty scientist.  By not countering the actual causes of dishonesty and corruption the only possible expectation is that this problem for science will not only continue, but also will increase.  The case of Dr. Obokata is not unique; many other cheaters are never caught, and the pressures to be dishonest remain active throughout the entire world of science.  

Concluding remarks. 

Dishonesty in science and cheating at research are ongoing very general problems that will not disappear due to wishful thinking.  Most cheating in science begins with a single individual, but soon spreads to involve associated research workers and administrators.  Much stronger penalties, much closer attention to detecting misconduct, and much better training about the necessity for total honesty in science are needed (see: “Why is it  so Very Hard to Eliminate Fraud and Corruption in Scientists?” ).  Cheating in order to get more research grant money is particularly liable to be increasing due to the overwhelming hyper-competition for acquiring research grants among modern university scientists (see: “All about Today’s Hyper-competition for Research Grants” ). 

[1]  Barbash, F., 2014.  An obscure academic journal.  A memorable peer review scandal.  The Washington Post, July 11, 2014, Morning Mix.  Available on the internet at:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2014/07/11/the-most-brazen-peer-review-scandal-anyone-can-remember/

[2]  Barbash, F., 2015.  Major publisher retracts 43 scientific papers amid wider fake peer-review scandal.  The Washington Post, March 27, 2015, Morning Mix.  Available on the internet at: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/03/27/fabricated-peer-reviews-prompt-scientific-journal-to-retract-43-papers-systematic-scheme-may-affect-other-journals/ .

[3]  Rasko, J. and Power, C., 2015.  What pushes scientists to lie?  The disturbing but familiar story of Haruko Obokata.  The Guardian , February 18, 2015.  Available on the internet at:  http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/feb/18/haruko-obokata-stap-cells-controversy-scientists-lie .  SPECIAL NOTE:  This is an extremely well-written and very perceptive report.  All scientists should read it!  Ditto for grad students and postdocs!

[4]  The Japan Times, Opinion, 2015.  Blight of research misconduct.  The Japan Times, February 18, 2015.  Available on the internet at:  http://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2015/02/18/editorials/blight-research-misconduct .

 

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