Tag Archives: big prizes in science

MORE SCIENCE Q&A FROM YOU TO DR.M, AND FROM DR.M TO YOU! 

 

Asking questions, answering questions, and questioning answers are vital for education! (http://dr-monsrs.net)
Asking questions, answering questions, and questioning answers are vital for education! (http://dr-monsrs.net)

 

An earlier Q&A session with Dr.M drew a good response (see “Questions About Science From You to Me, and From Me to You!” ), so further interchange should be worthwhile for all visitors.

Dr.M, I’m no good at mathematics!  Can I read and learn about science without needing to use all the equations? 

The answer is “yes!”.  You can learn at a very basic level without needing any math.  Your knowledge then will be somewhat simplified, but that is okay.  As one example, look up a subject or question that interests you on any internet wikisite; you will receive simple descriptions, explanations, and figures, which will provide a basic level of understanding.  But, try to recognize that numbers and quantization are very necessary for doing science and research (e.g., consider the analogy of what would professional baseball be without batting averages and other statistical measures?).

Dr.M asks you: what do you know about how the internet operates?  How does your e-mail travel so quickly to another state or a different country?  How do viruses get into your computer? 

Although it is true that you can use the internet without knowing anything at all about computers, it will be much better if you understand at least the fundamentals.  It’s easy to use the internet to find out more about the internet!

Where can I learn about the big new Zika virus epidemic? 

Use any browser to search on the internet for “Zika virus epidemic” or “Zika virus research”, and you will receive many pages of sites with information.  If you feel that some background is needed, first look on a wiki for “virus” or “Zika virus”.  As a special treat, you can see a fascinating and shocking expose by J. Chatterjee about the old origin of this new epidemic at “What is the Zika Virus Epidemic Covering Up?” !

What do the Big Prizes in science matter to me, Dr.M? 

The several large Science Prizes provide a means for everyone to honor and learn about some really successful research scientists (see: “What Does It Take to Win The Big Prizes in  Science?” , and, “New Multimillion Megaprizes for Science, Part I” ).  Check out some video interviews with the winners on websites for the different prizes; you will see much about both their praiseworthy research work and  their individual personalities (i.e., yes, famous scientists are very interesting people!).

As a graduate student in science, I have decided that I do not want to work in a university!  What should I do to get a good science-related job in business/industry? 

You will need much more than learning about science and research, and you must take the lead in getting that info!  Take or just sit in on a beginning course for business or finance.  If possible, find someone who is now doing what you are aiming for, and ask if you can meet with them to ask a few questions about their job and career.  Some businesses offer short internships that will provide a taste of what working there would be like.  Spend some time thinking about the key difference between what you want to do, and what you would be willing  to do (i.e., could you work as an advertising staffer, computer maintainer, designer, manager, media consultant, salesperson, software writer, survey taker, telephone service agent, etc.)?

Dr.M, why do I as a taxpayer have to help pay for building giant new telescope facilities in Chile and Hawaii?  Those mean nothing to me! 

These gigantically expensive very special research facilities will yield new advanced knowledge about astronomy, astrophysics, and space science, that present telescopes cannot obtain.  These facilities are so very costly that they can be funded only by contributions from multiple nations.  The new research findings will help you only indirectly, by adding to understanding about our universe.  If you feel that your own tax money is being wasted, then you should realize that the portion you are giving to build these new telescope facilities is only a miniscule part of your tax payments; a much greater portion goes for wars and welfare ….. how do you like that?

Where can I find the very latest in new technology, Dr.M? 

I recently recommended several good websites covering this subject (see: “More Science and Research Websites Recommended for You!” ).

I just cannot understand why scientific research has not yet found a cure for either cancer or the common cold!  Please explain, Dr.M! 

You probably are ignorant that some of the many types of cancer now are being cured, thanks to modern research and clinical advances (see: “Progress for Treating and Curing Cancer!” , and, “A Very New Immunotherapy for Cancer Wins the 2015 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award!” ).  The common cold is difficult to cure or prevent because the causative viruses are constantly mutating and changing; thus, a moving target must be knocked out, but it is impossible to predict where it will be (i.e., what the next mutation might be) before it has changed!

I’m a Full Professor in a science department at a large university, and I am forced to retire next year.  How can I keep doing research and publishing, Dr.M? 

If you are still able to be funded with a research grant, then you might be able to either stay at your present location as a resident researcher, or transfer to another institution as a visiting researcher.  If you don’t have a grant, see if you can find a well-funded colleague at another institution, who will let you work without salary in their lab on their research projects.  For the latter possibility, recognize that you need to be flexible; you might even want to work alongside someone who formerly was your biggest competitor!

Dr.M asks you: how many different ways can glyphosate get into your body?  How much do you now contain? 

Glyphosate is increasingly recognized as being a dangerous poison (see:  “What Happens When Scientists Disagree?  Part III: Is Glyphosate Poisoning Us All?” ).  If a farmer uses the weed-killer, Roundup (Monsanto Corporation), with his corn crop, and the harvested corn later is fed to chickens, how much glyphosate is ingested by humans when the chicken eggs or meat are eaten?  If farmers spread Roundup by aerial spraying, how much glyphosate then is present within the local tap water used for drinking or cooking?  How much glyphosate is present inside you or other people today?  Dr.M says that much more research should be done to answer these worrisome questions!

 

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HOW DO RESEARCH SCIENTISTS BECOME VERY FAMOUS?

 

How to Win a Supreme Prize in Science!    (http://dr-monsrs.net)
What does it take to Win a Big Prize in Science?     (http://dr-monsrs.net)

 

            Not all good research scientists advance to become famous, and almost all famous researchers do not achieve the highest honor of winning a Nobel Prize [1] or a Kavli Prize [2].  These facts make it seem rather mysterious how a scientist does achieve enough renown to be awarded one of those supreme honors.  What is it that makes a research scientist become famous? 

            Working scientists traditionally become acclaimed by their peers (i.e., other scientists in their field of study) primarily on the basis of one or more distinctive characteristics: (1) their experimental  findings achieve a breakthrough in research progress, thereby causing a dramatic shift of direction for many subsequent studies, (2) they resolve a long-standing research controversy, (3) they develop a new theory or concept that comes to have an expanding influence on the work of other researchers, or, (4) they invent and develop a new piece of research instrumentation or a new process for analysis of specimens.  These individuals, unlike the great bulk of ordinary research scientists, seem to have much good luck and are not so perturbed by the usual practical research problems with time and money; in one word, very famous scientists usually appear to be “blessed”.  These generalizations seem true for all the different branches of science, and are valid for scientists in numerous different countries. 

The Biggest Prizes in Science

            Only a very small handful of scientists are awarded the highest honors in science, a Nobel Prize [1] or a Kavli Prize [2].  There are many other famous scientists besides those few winners!  Some scientists are so ambitious that they undertake some of their experimental studies specifically to acquire a big prize; however, winning one of these awards is well-known to partly depend on circumstances beyond their control, such as being in the right place at the right time, succeeding with their research project to produce a widely hoped for result (e.g., creating a cure for some disease), or, working in a large field of study where many other researchers are active.  In addition, it is widely suspected that earning one of these top science prizes also depends upon certain unofficial qualifications, such as who you know, who dislikes you, and what area of science you are working with.  There can be no doubt that the awardees are fully deserving and are great scientists. 

            Readers can gain a much larger understanding about what it takes to win one of these elite honors by viewing some of the many fascinating video interviews with winners on the internet websites for the Nobel Prize (http://www.nobelprize.org/mediaplayer/ ).  These excellent videos examine the life and work of very famous scientists, both in modern times and from the last century.  Other videos present explanations of why their research work was judged to be so very important; corresponding written material is available for the Kavli Prize (http://www.kavliprize.no/seksjon/vis.html?tid=61429 ).  I have personally seen many of these and very highly recommend them to all non-scientists, as well as to younger scientists. 

The Path to Fame and Fortune in Science

            The path to fame and fortune in scientific research often is a progression of steps leading from local to national and then to international renown.  These steps reflect the formation of an enlarging network of other research scientists who are aware of the ambitious scientist, and have respect and admiration for what he or she is doing in the laboratory; eventually, the network expands so that even teachers, students, and various officials all become quite aware of this scientist.  Another mark of progressing towards fame and fortune involves receipt of more and more invitations to speak, to write, and to participate in science events at diverse locations around the world.  This advancement can be recognized by appointments to serve on committees of national organizations and editorial boards for science journals; in addition, progress also is shown by invitations to author review articles, and by receipt of public recognition within descriptive news reports in important general science journals such as Science and Nature.   Professional reputation usually moves in parallel to achievement of these hallmarks. 

            Common signs of success and fame in research scientists are achievement of some breakthrough experiment or invention, enlargement of lab personnel and research budget due to success with the research grant system, and widely acknowledged mastery in one’s field of science.  These hallmarks increase the reputation of research scientists.  For many good scientists, a very wonderful major honor is simply getting their research grants renewed, so they then are no longer required to work only on projects lasting for 3-5 years.  Nobel Laureates often, but not always, have success in dealing with the research grant system.  In addition to all the glory of winning one of the largest science prizes, there also can be some undesired consequences, such as too much attention, too many new demands for time, and, difficulty in maintaining the awardee’s extremely elevated status. 

            With regard to fortune, certain universities are notorious for paying their junior faculty only a very meager salary, but that changes dramatically when they advance in rank.  Professional scientists in academia and industry become financially comfortable, but do not usually consider themselves to really be rich.  Some university scientists do become very wealthy by starting one or more new small businesses centered on their expertise, creativity, and inventions; industrial scientists can receive bonuses for key contributions in enabling some new or improved product to be produced and marketed.  By the time of retirement, scientists usually have good savings and are entitled to full retirement benefits. 

Comments for Non-Scientists about Reputations and Awards

            Non-scientist readers should try to understand that a renowned and very appreciated faculty scientist at a college or small university might be very highly honored locally, and deservedly so, but could have little national renown and no international reputation.  Some other famous scientist working at a prestigious very large university might be more appreciated nationally and internationally, than locally.  My message here is that the amount of “success and renown” is relative; researchers do not have to become a Nobel Laureate or a Kavli Prize awardee in order to be recognized as being a famous and excellent scientist.   

            Some readers will wonder about whether a young scientist could direct all their professional efforts towards winning a big science prize, and succeed in this ambition?  That is possible in theory, but is very, very unlikely in practice.  Even if a researcher earned a doctorate at Harvard, was a Postdoc at Berkeley and Basel, achieved tenure at Columbia University (New York), and was good with both politics and people, there is no guarantee that this scientist will receive one of these very large honors.  There simply are too many unknowns and too many personalities involved to make receipt of a Nobel Prize or Kavli Prize anything other than very uncertain and doubtful.  In fact, some really outstanding research scientists do not receive the supreme award that they so clearly deserve [3].  I believe that it is good for scientists to be ambitious and to strive to win a big prize, but the simple fact is that very few excellent and famous researchers achieve this highest honor.  

 Concluding Remarks

            Many research scientists in academia and industry work very hard to achieve excellence and to be appreciated by their peers, students, and employer, and by the public.  There is no single path to becoming labeled as a famous scientist, and the route always contains many hurdles and frustrations.  When all is said and done, it always is internally satisfying if a mature scientist regards themself as being successful, even if they also have some human defects or run into insurmountable problems.  Self-satisfaction and peer recognition indeed are very big rewards for doing an excellent job in science and research. 

 

[1]  The Nobel Prize, 2014.  876 Nobel Laureates since 1901.   Available on the internet at:
http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/index.html  .

[2]  The Kavli Prize, 2014.  The Kavli Prize – Science prizes for the future.   Available on the internet at:
http://www.kavliprize.no/artikkel/vis.html?tid=27868 .

[3]  E. Westly, 2008.   No Nobel for you: Top 10 Nobel snubs.   Available on the internet at:
http://www.scientificamerican.com/slideshow.cfm?id=10-nobel-snubs .

 

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