Tag Archives: degeneration of science and research at universities

SCIENCE AND THE GOVERNMENT: WHAT’S RIGHT AND WHAT’S WRONG? PART II. 

 

US national government interacts with everything and everyone, including science, research, and scientists! (http://dr-monsrs.net)
US national government interacts with everything and everyone, including science, research, and scientists!   (http://dr-monsrs.net)

 

Science in the United States (US) directly interacts with people, small and large businesses, education, the health system, engineers, students, media, etc.  One of the very largest and most extensive interactions of science is with the US national government.  This 2-part essay takes a critical look at the many involvements of our government with science, research,, and scientists.  Part I introduced the means and purposes of the government’s interactions with science (see:  “Part I” ); this Part II will examine the positive and negative features resulting from governmental policies and actions for science and research.

What are government research grants doing to university scientists and to the conduct of their research studies in 2015? 

Billions of dollars are spent each year by our national government to fund research grants to university scientists for their investigations in all branches of science [1,2].  In 2013, over 5 billion dollars were awarded by the National Science Foundation to support research and education [3]; the National Institutes of Health dispenses even more money for health-related research and clinical studies  Since everyone benefits from progress in science, the US federal government should be praised for financially supporting so many university researchers and research projects.

Unfortunately, it also is true that there are some very serious negative features and counterproductive outcomes of the present research grant system in the US:

(1)  there is huge wastage of grant funds for university research  (see:  “Wastage of Research Grant Money in Modern University Science” );

(2)  basic research is less emphasized and funded than is applied research, thereby decreasing generation of new concepts, technologies, and research directions;

(3)  the chief goals for becoming a university scientist have changed from discovering new knowledge, conducting innovative experimental investigations to answer important research questions, and developing new technologies, to acquiring more dollars from more research grants;

(4)  due to the enormous number of scientists and applications for research grants, many approved studies only receive partial funding, thereby preventing full completi0n of their specific aims;

(5)  the extensive current hyper-competition for research grant awards directly causes and stimulates corruption and dishonesty in science;

(6)  composing many new research grant applications now takes up more time for many university science faculty than does doing research experiments in their laboratories;

(7)  the present hyper-competition for research grant awards means that postdoctoral research fellows increasingly are expected to obtain research grants, instead of doing advanced experiments under the support from their mentor’s grant(s);

(8)  the epitome of becoming a famous scientist has been changed from a researcher who makes major discoveries, establishes new directions via breakthrough experiments, achieves new understanding, and innovates new technology, into a scientist-manager who sits at a desk, rarely (if ever!) enters their laboratory rooms, and acquires some gigantic amount of research funding that enables employment of over a hundred research associates working inside a new research building;

(9)  money is absolutely everything for US universities in 2015, and their science departments are only business entities to generate increased profits (see:  “Money Now is Everything in Scientific Research at Universities” ); and,

(10)  items 1-9 produce degradation and decay of science and research in US universities, which explains why fewer college graduates now enter a career in science; their places in graduate schools now are filled by numerous foreign students, most of whom later find employment as science faculty and researchers in the US.

Some governmental interactions with science are good, but others are very bad! 

Among the good results, we can include that scientific research in the US  continues to produce new discoveries, issues many publications in science journals, creates some new directions, and makes some important progress.  US scientists continue to win the Nobel, Kavli, Lasker, or Breakthrough Prizes, and certainly are very deserving of being honored for their outstanding research achievements.  It is good that  governmental agencies regulate medical and laboratory research activities for reasons of safety, economy of expenses, and accountability, but this also can restrict creativity, innovation, and research freedom.  The US government should continue to support scientific research because that advances science and technology, and thereby leads to benefits for everyone in our society.

On the other hand, the quality of science and of the too numerous modern research publications both are going down.  The entire purpose of becoming a doctoral scientist working in universities has changed, and it is not surprising that this has resulted in the decrease of quality!  University science now is only a business where money and profits are everything, and faculty research scientists now are businessmen and businesswomen (see:  “What’s the New Main Job of Faculty Scientists Today?” ).  The federal research grant system fully supports all of this!  Obvious wastage of research funds continues to be accepted as an endemic problem in the research grant system (see: “Research Grants: What is Going on with the Indirect Costs of Doing Research?” ), making a mockery of the annual crying for more money to support science.  All these changes are obvious to most doctoral science faculty!

Hyper-competition for research grants could be the very worst feature of the status quo! 

The vicious and destructive hyper-competition for research grant awards degrades, distorts, and perverts scientific research at universities (see: “All About Today’s Hyper-competition for Research Grants” ).  This situation is directly caused by policies of both the funding agencies and the universities.  Both organizations approve and like the financial effects of the hyper-competition, and neither seems to understand how this  diverts and undermines scientific research.  Corruption and dishonesty in science are increasing every year, due in large part to the enormous pressures generated by this hyper-competition for research dollars (see:  “Why Would Any Scientist Ever Cheat?” ).  Hyper-competition now causes many university scientists to spend more time composing grant applications than they do working on research in their lab.

Why don’t the science faculty at universities speak out and take action? 

An obvious question is why faculty scientists tolerate the current degeneration in science and research at universities?  Several answers can be given.  First, university scientists in general are increasingly dissatisfied with their employment (see:  “Why are University Scientists Increasingly Upset with their Job?  Part I” , and, “Part II” ); every year some university scientists do move out of academia (of necessity, or by choice), and find a better job in industrial research, science-related companies, or non-science employments.  Second, most university scientists holding research grants do recognize the problems caused by the present system, but are too frightened to complain or criticize the research grant system since that could reduce their chances for renewal of their research funding; it seems safer and easier to simply keep quiet.  Third, US college students increasingly reject studying to get a PhD for a career in academia; increasing attention by graduate schools now is given to better preparing their science students for employment outside of universities or even outside of research.  Fourth, postdoctoral research fellows are organizing and announcing their misgivings about academic science in general and about abuses of their position as researchers in training.

My sad conclusion! 

Many of the problems I have described and discussed here are widely known to science faculty, but these issues are only rarely discussed in public or addressed by science societies at their annual meetings.  It thus appears to me that universities and the research grant system will have to get even worse before they can change to become better!

My foremost conclusion, based upon having personally seen how things used to be before the hyper-competition for research grants started and expanded, and, before the ongoing conversion of faculty scientists and postdoctoral research trainees into slaves, is that university science now is dying (see:  “Could Science and Research Now be Dying?” ).  I am not the only one to come to this sad conclusion (e.g., see:  “Science has been Murdered in the US, as Proclaimed by Kevin Ryan and Paul Craig Roberts!” ).

 

[1]  National Science Foundation, 2015.  Table 1. Federal obligations for research and development, by character of work, and for R&D plant: FYs 1951-2016.  Available on the internet at:  http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/2015/nsf15324/pdf/tab1.pdf .

[2]  American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2015.  Trends in federal R&D, FY 1976-2016.  Available o the internet at:  http://www.aaas.org/sites/default/files/DefNon_1.jpg .

[3]  National Science Foundation, 2015.  TABLE 4. Federal obligations and outlays for research and development by agency: FYs 2013-2015.  Available on the internet at:  http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/2015/nsf15324/pdf/tab4.pdf .

 

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