Tag Archives: job problems for scientists

JOB PROBLEMS FOR SCIENTISTS GET BIGGER IN 2016: HELP! 

 

The biggest problem for scientists is the entire SYSTEM for conducting research! (http://dr-monsrs.net)
The biggest problem for scientists is the entire SYSTEM for conducting research! (http://dr-monsrs.net)

 

The international science journal, Nature, has just released the results of its 2016 survey of job satisfaction by scientists and other professional research workers [1].  The new survey results are skillfully reported by author, Chris Woolston (see “Salaries: Reality Check” ).  This survey found that “nearly 2/3 of the 3,328 who responded to the question say that they are happy with their current job” [1]; that is good news, but the exact same figures also show that 1/3 of the respondents are unhappy!  The author concludes that the new survey “uncovered widespread unhappiness about earnings, career options, and future prospects” [1]!  Such a high level of job dissatisfaction is both amazing and worrisome!

My dispatch today discusses the shocking results of this 2016 survey.  For background information, please see my earlier articles on “Why Are University Scientists Increasingly Upset With Their Job?  Part I” , and, “Part II” .

Key features about the 2016 survey in Nature [1]!

Every 2 years Nature surveys salaries and job satisfaction with its many worldwide readers.  All in the survey are self-selected, meaning that those who are strongly disheartened or upset will be more likely to respond.  The respondents work in diverse positions, including everything from agricultural research to engineering; research workers in academia range from Postdocs to Full Professors.  The survey results are nicely broken down by age, geography, discipline in science, salary level, amount of job satisfaction or dissatisfaction, positive or negative effects of certain job conditions, and, biggest influence on career progression.  Woolston’s report on this 2016 survey is eminently readable (see: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v537/n7621/full/nj7621-573a.html )!

Notable results in this latest survey of researchers [1]! 

Money is the chief influence on scientists for creating positive or negative feelings about their job.  It determines their salary, pay raises, position, ability to do research studies, security, and future prospects.  Many report they are making financial sacrifices by pursuing a career in science [1].  Almost half the responders say that “the main challenge they face is competition for funding” (of their research) [1]. On the other hand, less than 20% of responders working in non-research positions listed competition for funding as a major problem; that probably is the chief reason they work in non-research jobs.

Geography has a major role in determining both salaries and job satisfaction for scientists, largely reflecting the status of the economy within different countries. At least 50% of responders in 8 nations believe job prospects now are worse than for previous generations; these include Brazil, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Soain, United Kingdom, and, United States [1].  Only 2 countries are listed where around 70% see job prospects now as being better than for previous generations (i.e., China, India) [1]; it seems likely that several other nations are in this group, but did not have sufficient responders to be listed.

Significant job problems for scientists beyond the very frequently cited harsh competition for research support funds d(see:  “All About Today’s Hyper-Competition for Research Grants” ) had only low levels of response, except for “lack of appropriate networks and connections” [1].  Scientists holding non-research jobs selected “lack of appropriate networks and connections” and “unwillingness or inability to sacrifice personal time or time with family” as their biggest job problem [1].

Direct quotations by working research scientists [1]!  

Many quotations from individual scientists are notably included in Woolston’s report [1].  These give a human side to the statistics reported, and some are very dramatic!

“There is no future in a research career in Italy” is stated by an Italian molecular biologist working in Naples [1].  She sees many young Italian scientists now relocating to other countries where their career path will not be so very difficult as in Italy [1].  Clearly, something must be extremely amiss to elicit this kind of explicit opinion!  Some other countries in Europe also are facing large difficulties in supporting research due to the condition of their national economy.

A Ukranian postdoc working on physics in Australia does not recommend a science career to people who ask him [1].  A faculty geneticist in Germany concurs and states, “Many people who wanted to do research end up as salespeople at some company” [1]!  Most of the public is blissfully unaware of these strongly negative feelings by scientists.

Are there other big problems besides money for today’s research scientists?  

Yes!  Several other big problems are particularly destructive for scientists working in academia (see: “The Biggest Problems Killing University Science Still Prevail in 2016!” ).  The increasing corruption in scientific research is not mentioned in the 2016 survey, but is painfully felt by faculty scientists.  Management of time is a very general difficulty for almost all academic scientists.

The large practical problems with money are directly caused by the bad policies of universities and of national research granting agencies or programs.  These causes and their effects are strongly interwoven, and combine into nothing less than a system problem!  It will not be enough to provide more money or to reform one or 2 conditions; instead, the entire system must be remodeled or replaced!

Many people do not see the devastating effects caused by the entrenched problems in scientific research.  Woolston’s report gives figures showing that 39% of all the different investigators responding would not recommend a research career [1]!  If the present downward course continues, the end result will be the death of science and research at universities (see:  “Could Science and Research Now be Dying?” ).

Concluding remarks! 

The 2016 survey of scientists by Nature indicates that today’s researcher is confronted by several difficult problems.  These result in conducting research becoming more problematic and scientists leaving the lab.  To rescue academic science from destruction, big changes must be made to the entire system for modern scientific research!

 

[1]  Woolston, C., 2016.  Salaries: Reality Check.  Nature  537:573-576.  Available on the internet at:  http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v537/n7621/full/nj7621-573a.html .

 

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